Help

Our website is pretty simple to navigate.  There are some tips that are handy to know though.

  1. The title at the top of the page will return you to your last location on the web.  This has the same effect as clicking the back arrow on your browser window.  The same thing happens for most photographs or images when you view the enlarged version.  Simply click the image again to go back to the same location that you were before.

  2. You may notice an asterisk (*) beside some words, usually at the end of a sentence.  These are links that will give you additional information when you move the mouse pointer over the link (try it).  Move the mouse pointer over names under portraits to see a popup tip too.  Many other regular text and graphic links also have additional hover tip information when you move the mouse pointer over the link.  Sometimes there is no clue that a hover tip exist so move your mouse around a bit, often you will be pleasantly surprised.  The hover tip will be displayed below and to the left of, right of, or centered under the link.  If the link is close to the bottom of the screen, you may not have enough room to be able to view all of the contents of the hover tip.  In these cases, scroll the display up and then revisit the hover tip.  Several hover tips on this page are lengthy so you will be able to see examples of this real soon.

  3. The background of our website is white for the main parts, and black on some sidebars.  Text colors are the opposite color (black on white, and white on black).  Text link colors are also a high contrast both before being clicked, and following.

    Any background or color must have text that is in high-contrast, which is very important for reading.  It is always easier to read our pages in an environment where the lighting will not reduce the effective contrast on the screen.  It is easier to read any text on a computer screen when there is very little lighting at all.  Most find that even at night, it is handy to have some lighting besides what the computer screen offers just to see other things such as the keyboard.

    If our pages are difficult to see and read, then it is a good indication that you have less than perfect lighting conditions.  If you adjust the lighting where our pages are easier to read, then all websites will be easier to view and read as well.  Try for a room where there are no lights other than the outside light.  Try it when the light filters in when the sun is directly overhead.  This may differ from what you consider a normally lit room.  What is often considered a normally lit room will still produce glares on the screen.  It is usually because we get used to the lighting conditions even though they are less than perfect.  The glares may be from outside light sources or inside sources.  Improving the lighting conditions will make using your computer much more enjoyable and can help reduce the stress that accompanies our daily lives.  One viewer thanked us because they hadn't thought about their lighting conditions (or noticed the glares) until reading this.  Now they use our website as a reference to help others.  Glad we could help.

    When using artificial lighting, it is always a good idea to position your screen and the lighting so that you do not have any glares on the computer screen.  Fluorescent lighting produces the most even lighting, especially if the bulbs are long (tube lights) to help spread out the light source.

  4. Links:   A link may be for a different website (external link), or on our own website (local link).  Link colors are dependent upon the color of the background.
    • White Background
      • Links that you have not visited yet are blue in color.  They will turn to (bold) red when the mouse pointer is moved over the link if the link has not yet been visited.  Once the link has been visited, the link turns to Fire Brick.  While the link is being used (not supported by all browsers or versions of browsers), the color will be a bold gray.



    • Black background
      • Links that you have not visited yet may be blue, light blue, or gold on the black background.  They will turn to (bold) red when the mouse pointer is moved over the link if the link has not yet been visited.  Once the link has been visited, the link turns to light blue.  While the link is being used (not supported by all browsers or versions of browsers), the color will be a bold gray.



    • For local links, the link may be for a different page, or a section of a different page or even the same page you are already on.  In the case where the link is on the same page you are already on, the link will be colored Fire Brick (since the page has already been visited).  If a link takes you to a different page but the link does not take you to the top of that page, you might consider scrolling to the top of the page after you read the information that the link took you to.  That way, you will know if there is something else you want to read on the same page (as its link will now be colored Fire Brick and you may think you have already visited the entire page).  You might also want to visit the exploded version of the Site Map to see if there are any pages you missed.

    • For external links, we are attempting to make all external text links be displayed in italics.  This is to help the viewer know that an italic link will be for an external website.  The original version of the website was not implemented with this in mind so changes are made when ones we missed are discovered.  Hopefully, we have most converted.

    • When you click on an external link, what happens depends on which browser (and Operating System) you use and how it is set up.  For example, in Internet Explorer and MS Windows, the link will use a different window* to display the results.  The first time you click on an external link, the window will be created and displayed in front of the "clicked-on" browser window.*  You can switch back to our website window by choosing the original browser window.  Depending on which operating system you use will determine where you select the original browser window.  For Windows, the different windows (tasks) are displayed on the task bar, which is normally at the bottom of the screen (unless you have chosen to move it to the sides or to the top). Other browser and operating system pairs may work differently.  For example, in some browsers (such as Opera, Mozilla, Firefox, Avant, Maxthon, Deepnet Explorer, and others), external links may cause a new window (task) to start, or it may cause a new "page" to start (depending on how you have set up the multi-tabbed browser).  A new "page" uses the same window.  Multi-tabbed browsers uses tabs to select different pages, therefore, you can view only one "page" at a time.  That works well if you use the entire space of your screen for the window, plus it keeps the task bar (in Windows) from getting crowded.  If you have a large screen and wish to display the different views at the same time, then configure your multi-tabbed browser to start a different window (task).  In some multi-tabbed browsers (such as Opera), you can also use right mouse clicks to control where the new results are viewed (new "page" or new "window").  In addition to Opera, there are several other browsers that support "multi-tabbed" views.  For example, you might like to check out Mozilla, Firefox, Deepnet Explorer, Maxthon, or Avant Browsers.  Windows XP SP2 has a new version of Internet Explorer that also supports multi-tabbed window views.



  5. The first line of a text link under a graphic may be in gold, light blue, or dark blue (or Fire Brick if you have already visited the link).  The text link may be in Italics or in Roman*.  Each has different meanings.  The links in Italics indicate that the linked page will be displayed in a different browser window than the main one* to display the results.  The first time you click on an external link, the window will be created and the window will be displayed in front of our website's browser window*, often because it will be an external link, although it may also be a page on our website.  The color of the links on the black background determines different things about the link.  The link colors are ranked by visibility on black.  Gold links are the highest ranked (more easily noticed).  Light Blue links are next, and Dark Blue links follow.  Generally links on the left hand side of the main pages will be in gold (to help ensure they are noticed).  Links along the right side will usually be in Light Blue, or Dark Blue.  Some links along the right side will also be in gold.  These links are special links due to affiliations, advertising support, or several other things.

  6. If you hear the common motorized camera sound when you move the mouse pointer over a text link, it is an indication the link will reveal a picture.  Make sure you have speakers turned on to catch the sounds.

  7. Accessibility:

    • We list phone numbers for some attractions or locations.  If you are deaf or hard of hearing, you can place calls via the Florida TTY Service at 1-800-955-8770 to access the service.

      You may also place calls via the Internet as a service provided by Sprint Communications, Inc..

    • If you are not able to use a mouse, you can move from one link to another on a webpage by using the tab key.  If you need to use the right mouse button, keep in mind that you can do the equivalent of a right mouse click by pressing Shift F10 on the link (Windows).

  8. The quick menu at the bottom will get you to major sections of the website (Some pages have an additional topic menu on the left side).  Notice that each menu item at the bottom has one letter underlined.  The same letter is used for more than one item.  Using the Alt key plus the letter will rotate through all choices for the letter.  When the one you want is colored (bold) gray, you can press the Enter key to go to that page*.

  9. If you think the text is too small for the menus, some browsers allow you to change the size of displayed text.  If you have a scroll wheel on your mouse, Internet Explorer and FireFox will allow you to change text sizes if you hold the Ctrl key down when rolling the mouse wheel.  If you do not see an instant change it could mean the text is formatted with cascading style sheets or it could mean your system is slower or is maxed out on memory.  Continued rolling back and forth without waiting for the change to take effect will make things worse on slower systems, maxing out to the point that the computer will hang!  Faster systems will see instant feedback.

  10. The Back link just above the main content at the top of the page will return you to your last location on the web.  This has the same effect as clicking the back arrow on your browser window.  This may save you a few hand movements.  The same thing happens for most photographs or images when you view the enlarged version.  Simply click the image again to go back to the same location that you were before.


  11. Many "Back" buttons that you see on websites are actually "forward" links that go to the page they "think" you came from.  Our Back buttons are actually a true back button, in that they work exactly like the Back button on the browser window.  This is especially helpful when viewing images as the enlarged image also works as a back button.  In most cases, you will click on a small image to see the enlarged view; after viewing the enlarged image, click on it to return.  Even if you accessed the enlarged image from the site map, when you click on the enlarged view, you would be returned back to the site map, exactly where you came from.  There is a back button at the bottom of each page.  Regardless of how much browsing you have done, if you want to "back" out of something, you can use the back buttons without worry that the browser's history will be accumulating.

  12. Links are Blue.
    The blue links in the body of the text:
    • When the mouse pointer is moved over the a link, it will turn to white with a tan background, be in bold, and have a red underline.  Once the link has been visited, the link changes to deep pink.

    The blue links at the bottom of the pages:
    • When the mouse pointer is moved over the link, it will turn to Red and be in bold.  Once the link has been visited, the link changes to deep pink.


    The blue links at the left side of the page:
    • will turn to white with a tan background and be in bold when the mouse pointer is moved over the link.  Once the link has been visited, the link returns to blue.

    To implement some special features, some links don't follow the standard guidelines.

    Normally, while a link is being used (not supported by all browsers), the color will be a bold blue.  Some browsers will display the links with an underline, others will not.

    Some links do not change color at all; the logic being that the link is not an important one and that links normally being a different color can be a distraction from the message of the text.  Therefore, these links are only visible by moving the mouse pointer over the text.  Do not worry, as these are not important links; they are only there in case someone were to move the mouse over the link.  When that happens a small hover tip will show up to give you additional information.

    A link may be for a different page, or a section of a different page or even the same page you are already on.  In the case where the link is on the same page, the link will already be Deep Pink.  If a link takes you to a page and the link does not take you to the top, you might consider scrolling to the top of the page after you read the information that the link took you to.  That way, you will know if there is something else you want to read on the same page (as its link will now be Deep Pink and you may think you have already visited the entire page).  Visit the Site Map to see if there are any pages you missed, although the Site Map only lists a starting point (e.g., Home.  Keep in mind that links sometimes fail to change in color even after visiting.  Links change color as a feature of the browser.  Older browsers do worst than newer browsers.  Even the latest browsers may fail to change the color.  The amount of memory available at the time can affect things as well.   Regardless of how much memory you have, the memory may already be allocated for some other purpose so browsers do not always change the color as expected.



  13. If you notice a link is in italics, it is to an external website.  We are not responsible for the content on other websites.

  14. Before printing a page, please read the page on printing.

  15. We test the website in several browsers. You can check out the full set of browsers if interested.

  16. Browser Differences It is our wish that the website look and work the same regardless of which web browser you use.  We have attempted to implement technology that will ensure that happening, however, making it look exactly the same regardless of browser is next to impossible due to some differences being extreme.  Firefox and Chrome are the most popular browsers on the web; Internet Explorer is no longer leading the popularity contest, taking over the position previously held by Mozilla, which took over the previous second place position held by Netscape). Mozilla started out as its own browser, then took on the code of Netscape, therefore making Mozilla a continuation of Netscape.
    • Browsers are based on just a few common rendering engines, and so some browsers may display similar to another, while some seem to interupt pages differently. Of the browsers listed, these have always had differences between what they display and what Internet Explorer displays for the same pages.  For example, Firefox/Netscape/Mozilla typically displayed text one size smaller than Internet Explorer.  Some websites (as we did) attempted to compensate to ensure that Firefox/Netscape/Mozilla viewers saw text sizes the same as Internet Explorer users.  This was accomplished by taking advantage of non-standard features of the HTMLL standard that Internet Explorer supported but Firefox/Netscape/Mozilla did not, and standard features of the HTML standard that Mozilla/Netscape/Firefox supported that Internet Explorer did not.  These "tricks" work only because the browsers supported different features, but these "work-arounds" cannot be guaranteed to work in the future.  Mozilla and Netscape are no longer being developed, but Firefox follows in their footsteps, all functioning similar to Netscape.  The same "trick" used to make text sizes match in older version worked in these later versions of the browsers as well, at least for a while.  Starting with Mozilla version 1.7, some parts of the trick didn't work since Mozilla started supporting more of the standard.  There are many browsers available and each has its differences. Due to the complexities of attempting to keep up with every variant of browser, we had rather concentrate on the web content instead.  We will assume that if you prefer to use a particular browser, then you accept the fact that there are differences.

  17. You should read the About page for additional information.